West Nile Updates

Ohio Department of Health links:

Fact Sheets
West Nile Virus Main Page
Ohio State University West Nile Info

Ohio Department of Health
Bob Taft, Governor
246 North High Street

J Nick Baird M.D., Director
P.O.Box l18
Columbus, Ohio 43216-0118

www .odh.state.oh.us

ODH PLANS ORAL RACCOON RABIES VACCINATION BAITING

COLUMBUS – The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) will once again participate in a multistate effort coordinated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Wildlife Services to stop the spread of raccoon rabies.

The Appalachian Ridge Oral Rabies Vaccination (ORV) Program baiting will be April 20 in Ohio, weather permitting, and cover two Ohio counties to provide a strengthened barrier of vaccinated raccoons.  Concentrated dispersals of baits will occur in areas within a five-mile radius of Lowellville, in Mahoning County and within a five-mile radius of East Palestine, in Columbiana County. This supplemental spring baiting will distribute oral rabies vaccine in areas where rabid raccoons were found in 2003 and reinforce the operation of September 2003 across northeastern Ohio. The regular major baiting effort will take place as usual in early September.

“Continued participation with the USDA and other states, in the Appalachian Ridge Oral Rabies Vaccination program, will prevent the spread of rabies and help protect public health as well as our domestic animals and wildlife,” aaid ODH Director J. Nick Baird, M.D.  “Because rabies is still present, surveillance for the disease and oral rabies vaccination programs must continue.”

Most of the baits will be distributed by air, with the use of specially equipped planes from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. In urban and residential areas, vaccine-laden baits will be distributed by ground teams in cars. Pennsylvania and West Virginia will also distribute baits in areas adjacent to the areas targeted in Ohio.

Residents are reminded to leave baits alone and to keep pets confined during the baiting period.  Dogs in particular, are attracted to the baits and will occasionally eat them.  The baits are not harmful to pets. Please keep the following information in mind:
* Know what the baits look like. They are 1.25 x 1.25 x .75 inches in size, brown and square in shape.  The vaccine packet is incased in a hard fishmeal polymer shell.
* Instruct children to leave the baits alone.
* Once your area is baited, keep dogs and cats inside or on leashes for up to five days. It is important raccoons have every opportunity to eat the baits.
* Do not attempt to take a bait away from your pet; you may be bitten.
* Anyone handling baits should wear gloves.  If baits are found in areas frequented by pets or children, toss them into deeper cover.  Damaged baits can be disposed of in the trash.
* If a person is exposed to the vaccine (red liquid), thoroughly wash any areas of the skin that came into contact with the vaccine with soap and
water.
* If someone has been exposed to the vaccine or has questions, call the local health department or ODH’s information line at 1-888-RABIES-1.

Ohio’s efforts to contain raccoon-strain rabies by creating a barrier of immunized raccoons have been very successful.  Because the disease continues to circulate among raccoons in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, on-going surveillance and vaccine treatments are necessary to keep Ohio free of raccoon rabies.

For more information about the ORV Program at ODH please visit our Web site
at: http://www.odh.state.oh.us/ODHPrograms/ZOODIS/ZooMain1.htm

Editors’ Note: Members of the media interested in scheduling interviews about the baiting should contact the ODH Office of Public Affairs at (614) 644-8562.  No media personnel will be permitted on flights per USDA policy.

 

 

N E W S

Office of Public Affairs. * (614) 644-8562 For Immediate Release Jay Carey, Director May 22, 2003

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM TICK- AND MOSQUITO-BORNE ILLSS

COLUMBUS -As Ohioans prepare to enjoy the Memorial Day holiday, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) urges all Ohioans to protect themselves against diseases carried by mosquitoes and ticks.

The 2002 West Nile virus (WNV) epidemic was the largest outbreak of any mosquito-transmitted disease in U.S. history. Ohio ranked third in the nation in the number of human cases of WNV illness in 2002, behind Illinois and Michigan There were 441 human cases with 31 fatalities reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It was a very high virus activity year, with 644 of 1,308 horses diagnosed with WNV, 877 of 1,663 dead birds positive, 125 of 1,350 live birds with antibodies to WNV and 1,976 of 8,250 mosquito pools (185,372 mosquitoes) tested positive.

“West Nile virus is an extremely preventable disease,” said ODH Director J. Nick Baird, M.D. “By taking some simple personal protection measures and eliminating mosquito breeding sites, Ohioans can enjoy a safe and healthy Memorial Day weekend out of doors. ”

To raise awareness about WNV and mosquitoes, ODH and local health departments this week launched a public education campaign that includes radio and television advertising, outdoor advertising (billboards) and printed material. The theme is “Fight the bite, Ohio” and reminds citizens of the simple steps they can take to protect themselves and their loved ones from potential exposure to WNV and other insect-borne illnesses.

Other mosquito-transmitted diseases in Ohio include La Crosse encephalitis, Eastern Equine encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis. Tick-transmitted diseases in Ohio include Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease. The Vector-borne Disease Program conducts surveillance for all these mosquito- and tick-borne diseases.

To help protect Ohioans from these and other illnesses, ODH suggests the following precautions during tick and mosquito season, which generally runs from April through September.

To avoid possible infection from tick and/or mosquito bites:

  • .Avoid outdoor activities between dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active.
  • If you must be outdoors, be sure to wear long pants, long-sleeved shirts, shoes and socks. Light colors are least attractive to mosquitoes and make it easier to see ticks.
  • Tuck pant bottoms into sock tops to keep ticks from getting under clothing- .
  • Use insect repellent containing DEET and follow the label directions.

To eliminate mosquito breeding sites near your home:

  • Remove all discarded tires and other water-holding containers, such as tin cans and unused flower pots, from your property. Eliminate standing water from your property.
  • Make sure all roof gutters are clean and properly draining.
  • Clean and chlorinate pools, outdoor saunas and hot tubs. Keep them empty when not in use and drain water from pool covers.
  • Change water in birdbaths weekly.

By following this advice and filling in holes in trees, residents can also protect themselves against La Crosse encephalitis, which is spread by the “treehole” mosquito. Since 1963, Ohio has recorded 940 cases of La Crosse encephalitis in 79 counties resulting in eight deaths.

The most common tick-borne diseases are Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and Lyme disease. Since 1956, Ohio has recorded 756 cases of RMSF in 70 counties; since 1993, ODH has recorded 979 cases of Lyme disease in 83 counties.

People who have symptoms -including high fever, headache, muscle aches, vomiting and loss of appetite – after a tick or mosquito bite should see their doctor and tell him or her about the encounter. If bitten by a tick, save it for identification by sending it to your local health department.

Editor’s note: For county-by-county disease totals, please visit the ODH Pressroom Web site at www. odhpressroom.org.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, Office of Public Affairs, 614-644-8562.

 

Ohio West Nile Virus Statistics: 2003

Visit Our Web Site at: http://www.odh.state.oh.us/odhprograms/zoodis/WNV/wnvupdate.htm

Information Updated: October 31, 2003

Birds (Final Bird Tally for 2003)

Dead Birds Tested = 1265 Positive Dead Birds = 175

Live Birds Tested = 654 Positive Live Birds = 20

Counties with Positive Birds = 72 Collection of first positive bird: May 29, 2003

 

Adams

Allen: 1 Sparrow, 3 Blue Jays

Ashland: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Cardinal

Ashtabula: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Goldfinch, 1 Crow

Athens: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Grackle, 1 Heron

Auglaize: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Robin

Belmont

Brown: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Sparrow

Butler: 4 Blue Jays, 1 Cardinal, 1 Sparrow

Carroll

Champaign

Clark: 2 Crows

Clermont: 1 Grosbeak, 1 Sparrow, 1 Titmouse, 1 Mockingbird

Clinton: 1 Cardinal, 1 Sparrow

Columbiana: 1 Crow

Coshocton: 1 Blue Jay

Crawford: 3 Crows, 1 Sparrow

Cuyahoga: 3 Blue Jays, 1 Grackle, 1 Robin, 12 live sparrows

Darke: 2 Blue Jays

Defiance: 1 Sparrow, 1 Robin

Delaware: 1 Grackle, 1 Crow, 2 Robins

Erie: 2 Crows, 1 Blue Jay

Fairfield: 1 Grackle, 1 Cedar Waxwing, 1 Dove

Fayette

Franklin: 1 Grackle, 1 Cardinal

Fulton: 1 Mourning Dove, 1 Sparrow

Gallia: 1 Dove, 1 Finch

Geauga: 2 Crows

Greene: 1 Crow, 1 Sparrow, 1 Blue Jay

Guernsey: 1 Blue Jay

Hamilton: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Grackle

Hancock: 1 Grackle, 1 Robin

Hardin

Harrison: 1 Hawk

Henry: 1 Cedar Waxwing

Highland

Hocking: 1 Blue Jay

Holmes: 1 Sparrow

Huron

Jackson: 2 Crows

Jefferson: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Sparrow, 1 Finch

Knox: 1 Blue Jay

Lake: 1 Finch, 3 Crows, 1 Cardinal

Lawrence: 3 Blue Jays

Licking: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Crow

Logan: 1 Woodpecker

Lorain: 1 Mourning Dove, 1 Blue Jay, 1 Wren, 1 pigeon

Lucas: 1 Robin, 1 Crow

Madison: 1 Cardinal

Mahoning: 1 Crow, 1 Blue Jay, 1 Robin

Marion: 1 Mourning Dove, 1 Crow

Medina: 1 Crow, 2 Blue Jays

Meigs

Mercer: 2 Blue Jays

Miami: 2 Crows

Monroe

Montgomery: 1 Blue Jay

Morgan

Morrow

Muskingum: 1 Robin, 1 Finch, 1 Cardinal

Noble

Ottawa: 1 Blue Jay

Paulding: 2 Blue Jays

Perry: 1 Crow

Pickaway: 1 Pigeon

Pike

Portage: 3 Crows

Preble: 2 Sparrows

Putnam: 1 Blue Jay

Richland: 1 Robin, 1 Crow

Ross

Sandusky: 3 Sparrows, 1 Blue Jay

Scioto: 1 Robin, 2 Sparrows

Seneca: 1 Crow

Shelby: 2 Blue Jays, 1 Sparrow

Stark: 2 Crows, 1 Finch

Summit: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Sparrow, 1 Crow, 1 Peacock

Trumbull: 1 Finch, 1 Chickadee, 3 Blue Jays

Tuscarawas: 1 Crow, 2 Blue Jays

Union: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Sparrow

Van Wert

Vinton: 1 Hawk

Warren: 1 Blue Jay, 2 Sparrows

Washington: 1 Goldfinch, 1 Sparrow

Wayne: 3 Cardinals, 2 Common Yellowthroats, 1 Sparrow, 2 Grey Catbirds (all live birds)

Williams: 1 Crow

Wood: 1 Blue Jay, 1 Sparrow, 2 Crows

Wyandot: 2 Sparrows, 1 Dove

 

Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes Tested = 427,894

Number of Pools Tested = 17,271

Positive Pools = 790 (new) in 32 counties

listed below:

 

Adams

Allen (2 pools)

Ashland (4 pools)

Ashtabula

Athens (8 pools)

Auglaize

Belmont

Brown (2 pools)

Butler (24 pools)

Carroll

Champaign

Clark

Clermont (9 pools)

Clinton

Columbiana

Coshocton

Crawford (1 pool)

Cuyahoga (166 pools)

Darke (1 pool)

Defiance

Delaware: (5 pools)

Erie (3 pools)

Fairfield

Fayette

Franklin (80 pools)

Fulton (7 pools)

Gallia

Geauga

Greene (1 pool)

Guernsey

Hamilton (160 pools)

Hancock (3 pools)

Hardin

Harrison

Henry

Highland

Hocking (2 pools)

Holmes

Huron

Jackson

Jefferson

Knox

Lake (55 pools)

Lawrence

Licking (1 pool)

Logan

Lorain (135 pools)

Lucas (16 pools)

Madison

Mahoning (13 pools)

Marion

Medina (6 pools)

Meigs

Mercer (1 pool)

Miami

Monroe

Montgomery (27 pools)

Morgan

Morrow

Muskingum

Noble

Ottawa

Paulding

Perry

Pickaway

Pike

Portage (3 pools)

Preble

Putnam

Richland

Ross

Sandusky

Scioto

Seneca

Shelby

Stark (18 pools)

Summit (27 pools)

Trumbull

Tuscarawas

Union

Van Wert

Vinton (4 pools)

Warren (2 pools)

Washington

Wayne (2 pools)

Williams

Wood

Wyandot (2 pools

 

 

Ohio West Nile Virus Statistics: October 31, 2003

Humans

Human Cases = 97 Deaths = 4

West Nile Fever = 23 West Nile Encephalitis= 74

Counties with Human Cases = 42 (new)

Adams: (1 case)

Allen

Ashland

Ashtabula

Athens

Auglaize

Belmont

Brown (1 case)

Butler (4 cases)

Carroll

Champaign

Clark (3 cases)

Clermont (2 cases)

Clinton (1 case)

Columbiana

Coshocton

Crawford

Cuyahoga (22 cases)

Darke: (3 cases)

Defiance (1 case)

Delaware

Erie (1 case)

Fairfield

Fayette

Franklin (3 cases, 1 fatal)

Fulton (1 case)

Gallia

Geauga

Greene: (2 cases)

Guernsey

Hamilton (3 cases)

Hancock (2 case)

Hardin

Harrison

Henry

Highland

Hocking

Holmes: (2 cases)

Huron: (1 case)

Jackson: (1 case)

Jefferson

Knox

Lake (1 case)

Lawrence

Licking (1 case)

Logan (1 case)

Lorain (6 cases)

Lucas (2 cases)

Madison

Mahoning: (2 cases)

Marion

Medina

Meigs

Mercer: (1 case)

Miami

Monroe

Montgomery(2 cases; 1 fatal)

Morgan (1 case)

Morrow

Muskingum

Noble

Ottawa

Paulding (2 cases)

Perry

Pickaway

Pike

Portage: (1 case)

Preble: (2 cases)

Putnam: (3 cases)

Richland

Ross

Sandusky: (1 case)

Scioto

Seneca

Shelby (1 case)

Stark: (3 cases, 1 fatal)

Summit

Trumbull: (3 cases)

Tuscarawas

Union (1 case)

Van Wert

Vinton

Warren (1 case)

Washington: (1 case)

Wayne (4 cases)

Williams: (1 case)

Wood: (1 case)

Wyandot (1 case, fatal)

 

Horses

Equine Cases Tested = 306

Positives = 95

Counties with Positive Equine cases = 43

Adams

Allen: 1 Horse

Ashland: 2 Horses

Ashtabula: 3 Horses

Athens

Auglaize: 2 Horses

Belmont

Brown: 2 Horses

Butler: 1 Horse

Carroll

Champaign: 3 Horses

Clark: 2 Horses

Clermont: 1 Horse

Clinton: 2 Horses

Columbiana: 1 Horse

Coshocton

Crawford: 1 Horse

Cuyahoga

Darke: 8 Horses

Defiance: 1 Horse

Delaware: 1 Horse

Erie

Fairfield

Fayette

Franklin

Fulton

Gallia

Geauga

Greene: 5 Horses

Guernsey: 2 Horses

Hamilton

Hancock: 1 Horse

Hardin: 1 Horse

Harrison

Henry

Highland

Hocking

Holmes: 2 Horses

Huron: 4 Horses

Jackson

Jefferson

Knox

Lake: 1 Horse

Lawrence

Licking

Logan: 9 Horses

Lorain

Lucas

Madison

Mahoning: 1 Horse

Marion: 1 Horse

Medina: 5 Horses

Meigs

Mercer

Miami: 3 Horses

Monroe

Montgomery 2 Horses

Morgan

Morrow: 1 Horse

Muskingum: 2 Horses

Noble

Ottawa

Paulding

Perry

Pickaway: 1 Horse

Pike

Portage: 3 Horses

Preble

Putnam: 1 Horse

Richland

Ross

Sandusky

Scioto

Seneca

Shelby: 5 Horses

Stark: 4 Horses

Summit: 1 Horse

Trumbull: 2 Horses

Tuscarawas

Union

Van Wert: 1 Horse

Vinton

Warren: 2 Horses

Washington: 1 Horse

Wayne: 1 Horse

Williams: 1 Horse

Wood

Wyandot: 1 Horse